Developing injury indicators for First Nations and Inuit children and youth in Canada: a modified Delphi approach


The purpose of this research was to take the initial step in developing valid indicators that reflect the injury issues facing First Nations and Inuit children and youth in Canada.

Using a modified-Delphi process, relevant expert and community stakeholders rated each indicator on its perceived usefulness and ability to prompt action to reduce injury among children and youth in indigenous communities. The Delphi process included 5 phases and resulted in a refined set of 27 indicators.

Indicators related to motorized vehicle collisions, mortality and hospitalization rates were rated the most useful and most likely to prompt action. These were followed by indicators for community injury prevention training and response systems, violent and inflicted injury, burns and falls, and suicide.

The results suggest that a broad-based modified-Delphi process is a practical and appropriate method, within the OCAP™ (Ownership, Control, Access and Possession) principles, for developing a proposed set of indicators for injury prevention activity focused on First Nations and Inuit children and youth. Following additional work to validate and populate the indicators, it is anticipated that communities will utilize them to monitor injury and prompt decisions and action to reduce injuries among children and youth.

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