Reports & Publications

A Best Practices Guide for the Prevention of Falls Among Seniors Living in the Community


A Best Practices Guide for the Prevention of Falls Among Seniors Living in the Community was prepared for the officials of the federal, provincial and territorial Ministers Responsible for Seniors in Response to the Ministers’ request for a review of fall prevention programs and practices and to provide the evidence for effective approaches for reducing injury among seniors as well as efficient means of delivering prevention programs. The Guide is…

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An Inventory of Canadian Programs for the Prevention of Falls & Fall-Related Injuries Among Seniors Living in the Community


The personal, economic and societal costs of falls among seniors in Canada is enormous, yet, up to now, relatively little has been done to address this serious health threat. This lack of action exists in the context that one third of seniors fall each year (O’Loughlin, 1993) and approximately half of these falls result in a minor injury, and up to 25 percent result in serious injury such as fractures or sprains (Alexander et al., 1992, Nevitt et al., 1991).

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Injury Prevention Program Evaluation Manual


This manual was created to make evaluation a user-friendly process. Many of the ideas and concepts are not original but compiled and adapted from existing sources (see Bibliography). The overall goal is to assist communities in British Columbia in evaluating their injury prevention programs. This manual will provide you with information about the evaluation process so that you will have a better understanding of what evaluation is all about. It…

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Making Sense of Injury Data


Understanding and interpreting data is the process by which we make sense of data and such a process involves various ways of looking at the data. In this workshop, we examine one of the most prevalent ways of looking at injury data, using examples from injury mortality and hospitalization data in British Columbia.

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Effects of Neighbourhood, Family, and Child Behaviour on Childhood Injury in Canada


This study addresses three groups of questions relating to childhood injury in Canada: (1) Is the relationship between family functioning and childhood injuries mediated or modified by parenting or child behaviour? (2) Which is more strongly related to childhood injuries, family socioeconomic status (SES) or indicators of neighbourhood disadvantage? Do they modify the effect of each other? The interaction of these factors with family functioning, parenting or child behaviour is…

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Unintentional Injuries in British Columbia: Trends and Patterns Among Adults and Seniors, 1987-1998


View executive summary (PDF) » The injury literature shows that patterns of injury can be identified on the basis of age, gender, cause, social characteristics and geographic location (Rivara & Mueller, 1987). These patterns represent opportunities for prevention. For example, injuries have been found to be more common in lower income households, and people living in rural areas are at greater risk than their metropolitan counterparts. These patterns point to…

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Patterns of Health Care Use of Injured and Non-injured Children


This study examines associations between maternal reports of childhood injuries during the last 12 months and visits to medical practitioners by age group and gender of the child. In our models we include factors that have been shown to influence both injuries and health service use including gender of the child as well as family socio-demographic indicators such as marital status, household income, house- hold size, and maternal levels of education.

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Patterns of Motor Vehicle Traffic Injuries in British Columbia, 1995-1998


In 1995, Motor-vehicle traffic injuries (MVTI) represented 31 percent of all causes of death among Canadian males aged 15-19 years old, and 42 percent among Canadian females in the same age group (Health Canada, 2000). MVTI are the leading cause of death by injury in British Columbia among 0-24 years olds for both males and females (Soubhi, Raina et al., 1999). From 1987 to 1996, mortality rates involving MVTI for…

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Are Child Pedestrians at Increased Risk of Injury on One-way Compared to Two-Way Streets?


Objectives: To compare child pedestrian injury rates on one-way versus two-way streets in Hamilton, and examine whether the characteristics of child pedestrian injuries differ across street types. Methods: The rates of injury per child population, per kilometre, per year were calculated by age, sex and socioeconomic status (SES). Child, environment and driver characteristics were investigated by street type. Results: The injury rate was 2.5 times higher on one-way streets than…

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